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Articles labelled ‘Reviews’

  • A Murder on Malabar Hill

    Book Review: A Murder on Malabar Hill

    Sujata Massey's novel is best described by Dirk Gently’s maxim that to solve a crime, one must investigate the society in which it takes place.
  • I Am a Troll

    Book Review: I Am a Troll

    A worthy venture into the deep, dark world of Indian cyber-terrorism that should attract more detailed investigations and the placement of legal safeguards online.
  • Slow Startle

    Book Review: Slow Startle

    Rohan Chhetri does not make any bones about the fact that Slow Startle is a book about death.
  • We That Are Young

    Book Review: We That Are Young

    Preti Taneja's Delhi contains sustained subterranean anger, abundant misogyny, and the superficial glory of unimaginable wealth.
  • Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows

    Book Review: Erotic Stories for Punjabi Widows

    Balli Kaur Jaswal’s third novel deals with honour killings, vigilante community policing, murder, forbidden love, and a lot more.
  • Leila by Prayaag Akbar

    Book Review: Leila

    Prayaag Akbar’s biggest triumph lies in his ability to adopt a female voice so completely, you forget this is a male author’s debut novel.
  • Greenlight

    Book Review: Greenlight

    The sixth book in Kalpana Swaminathan’s acclaimed Lalli detective series is not for the faint-hearted.
  • Immoderate Men

    Book Review: Immoderate Men

    The book explores chauvinism, patriarchy, and the male psyche in an interesting and honest manner.
  • A Book of Light

    Book Review: A Book of Light

    A book that forces us to confront our own biases, look our carefully crafted ignorance in the eye, and come out of the bubble of privilege we inhabit.
  • Laksmi Pamuntjak Amba

    Book Review: Amba

    A sense of nostalgia and loss pervades Laksmi Pamuntjak's ambitious debut novel Amba.
  • Meghna Pant

    Unknown Husbands

    New husbands are like burrs: they stick, they irritate, and they’re mostly unwanted.
  • Munnu

    Reading Munnu in Kashmir

    Malik Sajad’s heartwrenching graphic novel traces the generations that grew up in Kashmir post 1990.

Testimonial Comics #25

By Nishant Jain