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Issue: March ’11

  • Book Review: Susanna’s Seven Husbands

    The mystery remains intact in Ruskin Bond's original short story, and the suspense is held captive under a gravestone---or seven.
  • Mirror, Mirror: Part Two

    The central underlying theme of Peeping Tom is voyeurism, captured through an aggressive and violating camera.
  • The Other: Part One

    Gender differentiation has played a significant role in hailing masculine art as ‘great’ or ‘serious’ and reducing so-called feminine art as the ‘other’.
  • Love and Longing in the Sixties

    A petition may be a poem, and a poem may be a petition, but neither a poem nor a petition is the revolution.
  • Book Review: The Fakir

    The Fakir is a simple tale with an important social message in a world where material things define boundaries between human beings.
  • Book Review: Room

    Emma Donoghue's award-winning book is devastating, tough, moving, tragic, and funny, all at the same time.
  • Learning to Fly

    Iranian-born author Abbas Kazerooni spoke to us about what made him want to share his remarkable story of hope, survival, and growing up in On Two Feet and Wings.
  • Through the Eyes of Another

    Award-winning author Pallavi Aiyar speaks to us about her latest novel Chinese Whiskers and life in China.
  • Five Seconds of Fame

    Welcome to a rage called MTV Roadies. Suffering has never been made so sweet.
  • Why I Love Delhi

    Delhi’s oldness is alternative to, independent of, but equally conscious and respectful of the new.
  • Hidden-Away Surprises

    Bylakuppe is a colourful slice of Tibet hidden away in the southern half of India.
  • Book Review: Rights of Man

    Utpal Dutt revisits the racial discrimination, injustice, and denial of human rights as witnessed in the Scottsboro trials of 1931.
  • Stories of Their Own

    In conversation with Aurora Jane about the band's tour of India, their latest album Deep End, working with kids in Dharavi, and learning to cope with paneer withdrawal symptoms.
  • Mirror, Mirror: Part One

    Stanley Kubrick's A Clockwork Orange embodies the conflict between individual free will and state control.
  • Film Review: Dhobi Ghat

    If realism is the leading manifesto of an art film, then Dhobi Ghat manages it effortlessly.
  • The Experimental Nomad

    An exclusive interview with acclaimed abstract artist Anjali Sinha about her work and the art scene in India.
  • Book Review: Urban Shots

    13 writers explore common themes of love, friendship, angst, and longing in this carefully compiled anthology.
  • Marriage Aaj Kal

    Where do women like us expect to find our men? And where and when exactly do these men of today expect to find their women?
  • Film Review: The Illusionist

    Sylvain Chomet's animated take on the life of a middle-aged Vaudevillian magician overflows with rainy-day beauty and mystery.
  • Book Review: Reflected in Water

    This part-travelogue, part-reverie helps reinvent Goa, a place that is largely misunderstood.
  • Art, Cash, and the Summit

    Is art being created any more for art’s sake? Who or what can determine the price of a piece of art?

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