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Issue: August-October ’13

  • Butterfly Love

    Butterfly Love

    Layers upon layers of fabric, he knew, were surely hampering his beloved white butterflies from fluttering in the breeze.  #fiction
  • Happy Birthday and other stories

    Book Review: Happy Birthday! and Other Stories

    With her second book, Meghna Pant offers an emotional, compelling insight into the lives of people around us.  
  • Goldspot

    Album Review: Aerogramme

    It is by listening to the songs as incomplete but coherent narratives set to music that Goldspot's latest album comes into focus.  
  • Skylight, illustration by Pooja Satish

    Skylight

    I was always watching you but you never felt the heat of my gaze.  #fiction
  • Fugitive No More, illustration by Kruttika Susarla

    Fugitive No More

    You would be pleased to know that the evidence has been removed.  #poetry
  • Swadeshi

    Swabhimaan Gone Wrong

    There is a need to reclaim notions like Swadeshi and Swabhimaan from jingoists and rid them of their unnecessary historical baggage.  
  • David, illustration by Tara Isha

    David

    There is nothing to be said. The hour is past, and he should leave.  #fiction
  • Karthika Nair

    Seeking Movement

    In conversation with Karthika Nair about her poetry, scripting dances, and escaping labels.  
  • Cough Syrup Surrealism

    Book Review: Cough Syrup Surrealism

    In Tharun James Jimani’s debut novel, the personification of the 1990s, while never quite made obvious, is apparent in every page.  
  • The noble lungi

    The Case for the Lungi (and Against Pants)

    Nothing epitomises ‘casual’ more than a free-flowing lungi.  
  • Tall Tales

    Stories to Tell

    In conversation with Tall Tales co-founders Kaneez Surka and Michael Burns about the way forward for live storytelling in Mumbai.  
  • Duet, illustration by Tara Isha

    Duet

    She felt as though she had done something terrible. But technically, she had just been singing in her own bathroom, hadn't she?  #fiction
  • Illustration by Nirupa Roy

    Sex, Stories, and Power Trips

    We are being told a story; one that elevates downright misogyny to the revered status of Indian Culture.  
  • Papercut, illustration by Dyuti Mittal

    Paper Cut on My Tongue

    When we left, we knew we’d probably never find our way back again.  #fiction
  • Anonymous Asked, illustration by Kamal Singh

    Anonymous Asked: What Is Dating Like in Sri Lanka? And for You?

    You can do it. Accept that he isn’t upper class diplomatic or a refugee of war or lover turned killer.  #poetry
  • Bandages, illustration by Kamal Singh

    Why Else Do You Think I Carry Bandages?

    Salves and salvation were two poles, and he, like the Earth itself, was slightly flattened at the doorstep of both.  #fiction
  • Mother, illustration by Tara Isha

    Mother

    I take you like a paper doll and crumple you.  #poetry
  • Cover: Nitoo Das

    The Outsider

    Teacher, poet, and photographer: Nitoo Das speaks to us in an exclusive interview about writing and performing poetry, and her love of birds.  
  • Trees, illustration by Kamal Singh

    Trees

    The girl and the boy made love to each other every night, and every night they climaxed knowing that they had climbed trees to get to one another.  #fiction
  • Lost Bells, Illustration by Tara Isha

    Lost Bells

    Even in his blue silk dhoti, Shekhar looks like a walking insect—a fancy walking insect. It is an interesting look for someone with no personality.  #fiction
  • A Matter of Rats

    Book Review: A Matter of Rats

    Despite the emotions that bind this collection of stories, Kumar’s prose is never elegiac. There is always humour, love, and the possibility of redemption.  
  • Roseapples, illustration by Dyuti Mittal

    Hyphens Are Pink

    There were moments when our rhythms matched, and our feet, with a muddy shoe or two, were up in the blue sky together.  #fiction
  • Jobless Clueless Reckless

    Book Review: Jobless Clueless Reckless

    Revathi Suresh's debut effort is a coming-of-age novel and it takes that trope head on, without cloaking it in something else.  

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